What We Believe

Faith is about trust 
...which is why you won't find a creed here. We take our faith seriously, but we trust each person to weigh scripture and tradition, reason and experience, and then act out our faith in works of compassion and justice toward others.

When Jesus was asked what mattered most, he said to love God and love others. Everything he tells his disciples to do is rooted in love. 

So, we trust in Jesus to show us what's good and true about God. And careful attention to his words shows him to be more concerned about how we take care of people in need than what doctrines we promote.

Bottom line: we focus on how to love God and neighbor. We engage in rigorous study and lively worship, centering prayer and healing body-spirit-mind, feeding the hungry and changing the oil in single moms' cars. We encourage those who hear a calling to any ministry of love and justice to share it with the community. Then we seek consensus on how best to follow that call. 

Practices
There are two Christian practices that have been characteristic of Disciples of Christ since the beginning. First, while we honor all baptismal traditions, we generally baptize by immersion those who make their own confession of faith. For those already baptized in other traditions, we ask for a reaffirmation of their trust in Jesus. Second, as a sign of the welcome we receive and the unity to which we are  called, we offer and receive communion every week. 

Here's a little more about our wider church, the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), one of the oldest American-born denominations, and increasingly among the most progressive.




The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), while founded on American soil in the early 1800s, is uniquely equipped to live up to its identity as a "movement for wholeness in a fragmented world." 

We continue to be influenced by our founding ideals of unity in Christ, confidence in reason, and practical human experience, with openness and diversity in practice and belief.

"In essentials, unity. In non-essentials, diversity. In all things, love"